Drill at the Halt

  1. In foot drill, there is to be no exaggerated movements of the arms, feet and legs.
  2. Between each and every stage in the execution of a command, there will be a “regulation” or “standard” pause that is the equivalent of two beats in quick time.

Attention

Attention Position

The position of “attention” is one of readiness in expectation of a word of command. Exactness in this position is important and, therefore, the Pathfinder should not be at “attention” for a longer time than necessary.

“Pathfinders, atten-TION.”
The following position is to be adopted sharply:

  1. Place the heels together and in line.
  2. Feet turned out to an angle of 30 degrees.
  3. Knees braced.
  4. Body erect with the weight evenly between the balls of the feet and the heels.
  5. Shoulders level, and squared to the front.
  6. Arms hanging straight from the shoulders, elbows close to the sides.
  7. Wrists straight.
  8. Hands closed (not clenched), back of the fingers lightly touching the thighs.
  9. Thumbs straight and to the front.
  10. Head up; eyes open, steady, and looking their own height.
  11. No part of the body strained.

Attention from Stand at Ease.

“Pathfinders, atten-TION.”

  1. Bend the left knee and bring the left foot to the position of “attention”, and
  2. At the same time bring the arms and hands to the position of “attention”.
Attention
Hands closed while at attention

Common Faults

  1. A strained and exaggerated position causing breathing to be restricted.
  2. Unsteadiness caused by not being correctly balanced on both feet.
  3. Feet and body not square to the front, heels not closed and in line.
  4. Arms bent, elbows pulled back.
  5. Wrists crooked.
  6. Feet not correct angle of 30 degrees.
  7. Scraping the feet on the ground.
  8. Rising on the toes and clicking the heels.
  9. Hopping or leaving the ground with both feet at once.

Stand at Ease

Stand at Ease Position

The “stand at ease” is an intermediate position between “attention” and“stand easy”. It allows no relaxation but can be maintained for a longer time then “attention” without strain.
“Pathfinders, stand at EASE.”

The following position is to be adopted sharply:

  1. Keeping the right foot still and the leg braced back, bend the left knee, carry the left foot sharply to the left so that the feet are 20-30 cm apart, depending on the size of the Pathfinder, heels still in line, and the feet at the same relative angle as in “attention”.
  2. Transfer the weight of the body evenly over both feet.
  3. At the same time bring the arms behind the back, keeping them straight, and place the back of the right hand in the palm of the left, thumbs crossed, fingers and hands straight and pointing toward the ground or floor.
  4. Note that when a book or any articles are being carried on parade the arms will be held to the side as for “attention”. The book or other such items that can be carried in one hand will be carried by the left. If articles are only carried in the left hand, the right arm must remain at the side as for the position of“attention”.  When marching, objects are to be held in the left hand and the arm kept still. The right arm is free to swing.
Stand at Ease

Common Faults

  1. Failure to carry foot off 20-30 cm and not square to left.
  2. Not maintaining the angle of the foot and heels not in line.
  3. Movement of the right foot and consequent loss of dressing.
  4. Binding forward during movement.
  5. Flapping the arms.
  6. Arms not fully extended.
  7. Hands not clasped in the correct position.

Stand Easy

Stand Easy Position

The position of “stand easy” is given when it is desirable to permit the Pathfinders to relax. This command is only given when the club is in the position of “stand at ease”.

“Pathfinders, stand EASY.”

  1. The head, body and limbs are relaxed.
  2. Clothing and equipment may be adjusted.
  3. Pathfinders must not move feet or talk, or lower hips.
Stand Easy

 

Common Faults

  1. Moving the feet, resulting in losing position.
  2. Slouching and talking.

 

Right Turn

“Pathfinders, right TURN.”

  1. Keeping both knees straight, turn through 90 degrees to the right, on the right heel and the ball of the left foot, raising the left heel and the right toe in doing so, keeping the weight of the body on the right foot.
  2. On completion of the movement, the right foot is flat on the ground, the left leg to the rear with the heel raised, and turned slightly inwards.
  3. Both knees braced back, and arms in the position of “attention”.
  4. Bend the left knee and bring the left foot sharply to the right into the position of “attention”.

Right Turn

Right Turn – Foot Movement

Common Faults

  1. The weight being put on the rear foot, allowing the heel of the forward foot to move over the ground instead of pivoting.
  2. Scraping the ball of the right foot over the ground, instead of lifting the toes.
  3. Bending the knee of the pivot leg, and bending forward particularly during the second movement.
  4. Not making a square turn with the body and shoulders.
  5. Moving the arms.

Left Turn

“Pathfinders left TURN.”

  1. Keeping both the knees straight, turn through 90 degrees to the left, on the left heel and the ball of the right foot, raising the right heel and the left toe in doing so, keeping the weight of the body on the left foot.
  2. On completion of the movement, the left foot is flat on the ground, the right leg to the rear with the heel raised, and turned slightly inwards.
  3. Both knees braced back, and arms in the position of “attention”.
  4. Bend the right knee and bring the right foot sharply to the left into the position of “attention”.

 

Left Turn

Left Turn – Foot Movement

Common Faults

  1. The weight being put on the rear foot, allowing the heel of the forward foot to move over the ground instead of pivoting.
  2. Scraping the ball of the left foot over the ground, instead of lifting the toes.
  3. Bending the knee of the pivot leg, and bending forward particularly during the second movement.
  4. Not making a square turn with the body and shoulders.
  5. Moving the arms.

About Turn

“Pathfinders, about TURN.”

  1. Keeping both the knees straight, turn through 180 degrees to the right, on the right heel and the ball of the left foot, raising the left heel and the right toe in doing so, keeping the weight of the body on the right foot.
  2. On completion of the movement, the right foot is flat on the ground, the left leg to the rear with the heel raised, and turned slightly inwards.
  3. Both knees braced back, and arms in the position of “attention”.
  4. Bend the left knee and bring the left foot sharply to the right into the position of “attention”.

About Turn

About Turn – Foot Movement

Common Faults

The weight being put on the rear foot, allowing the heel of the forward foot to move over the ground instead of pivoting.

  1. Scraping the ball of the right foot over the ground, instead of lifting the toes.
  2. Bending the knee of the pivot leg, and bending forward particularly during the second movement.
  3. Not making a square turn with the body and shoulders.
  4. Moving the arms.
  5. Taking the right foot back to the left foot to complete the second movement, thus upsetting the dressing.

Right Incline

  1. “Pathfinders, right in-CLINE.”
    Keeping both the knees straight, turn through 45 degrees to the right, on the right heel and the ball of the left foot, raising the left heel and the right toe in doing so, keeping the weight of the body on the right foot.
  2. On completion of the movement the right foot is flat on the ground, the left leg to the rear with the heel raised, and turned slightly inwards.
  3. Both knees braced back, and arms in the position of “attention”.
  4. Bend the left knee and bring the left foot sharply to the right into the position of “attention”.

Right Incline

Common Faults

  1. The weight being put on the rear foot; allowing the heel of the forward foot to move over the ground instead of pivoting.
  2. Scraping the ball of the right foot over the ground, instead of lifting the toes.
  3. Bending the knee of the pivot leg, and bending forward particularly during the second movement.
  4. Not making a square turn with the body and shoulders.
  5. Moving the arms.
  6. Taking the right foot back to the left foot to complete the second movement, thus upsetting the dressing.

Left Incline

“Pathfinders left in-CLINE.”

  1. Keeping both the knees straight, turn through 45 degrees to the left, on the left heel and the ball of the right foot, raising the right heel and the left toe in doing so, keeping the weight of the body on the left foot.
  2. On completion of the movement, the left foot is flat on the ground, the right leg to the rear with the heel raised, and turned slightly inwards.
  3. Both knees braced back, and arms in the position of “attention”.
  4. Bend the right knee and bring the right foot sharply to the left into the position of “attention”.

Left Incline

Common Faults

  1. The weight being put on the rear foot, allowing the heel of the forward foot to move over the ground instead of pivoting.
  2. Scraping the ball of the left foot over the ground, instead of lifting the toes.
  3. Bending the knee of the pivot leg, and bending forward particularly during the second movement.
  4. Not making a square turn with the body and shoulders.
  5. Moving the arms.
  6. Taking the right foot back to the left foot to complete the second movement, thus upsetting the dressing.

Paces Forward or Back

“Pathfinders, “X” paces forward MARCH.”
“Pathfinders, “X” paces backward MARCH.”

  1. The movement is carried out in quick time but with the arms held by the sides.
  2. Each rank concerned will march forward /backwards the required number of paces called for, stepping off with the left foot.
  3. Each pace is to be approximately 50 cm.

Paces Forward/Back

Common Faults

  1. Taking a pace too short with the left foot.
  2. Looking down at the ground.

Side Paces to the Left

“Pathfinders, “X” paces left close MARCH.”

  1. During the side pace, other parts of the body will maintain the position of “attention”.
  2. Bend the left knee
  3. Carry the left foot off to the left a distance of 30cm.
  4. Raise the right heel approximately 2.5cm.
  5. Bend the right knee and bring the right foot sharply to the left into the position of “attention”.
  6. Continue ‘1’ to ‘5’ above for each pace to be covered.

Paces Left Close March

Side Paces to the Right.

“Pathfinders, “xx” paces right close MARCH.”

  1. During the side pace other parts of the body will maintain the position of “attention”.
  2. Bend the right knee
  3. Carry the right foot off to the right a distance of 30cm.
  4. Raise the left heel approximately 2.5cm.
  5. Bend the left knee and bring the left foot sharply to the right into the position of “attention.”
  6. Continue ‘1’ to ‘5’ above for each pace to be covered.

Paces Right Close March

Common Faults

  1. Uneven paces causing loss of covering and dressing.
  2. Failure to close heels at each pace.
  3. A tendency to move the left foot before the right has been placed firmly on the ground.